Racial Healing and Equity in the American South

Racial Healing and Equity in the American South

Manuel Pastor

10.19.2012

Manuel Pastor

Dr. Manuel Pastor is Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California where he also serves as Director of USC's Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) and co-Director of USC's Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration (CSII). Founding director of the Center for Justice, Tolerance, and Community at the University of California, Santa Cruz, Pastor holds an economics Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and has received fellowships from the Danforth, Guggenheim, and Kellogg foundations and grants from the Irvine Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Hewlett Foundation, the California Environmental Protection Agency, the California Wellness Foundation, and many others. In recent years, his research has focused on the economic, environmental and social conditions facing low-income urban communities in the U.S., resulting in articles published in Economic Development Quarterly, Review of Regional Studies, Social Science Quarterly, Journal of Economic Issues, Journal of Urban Affairs, Urban Affairs Review, Urban Geography, and elsewhere.

He served as a member of the Commission on Regions appointed by California’s Speaker of the State Assembly, and in January 2002 was awarded a Civic Entrepreneur of the Year award from the California Center for Regional Leadership. He is a member of the Building Resilient Regions research network sponsored by the MacArthur Foundation.

A professor of American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California, Manuel Pastor gives a lecture on the topic “Pathways to Racial Healing and Equity in the American South: A Community Philanthropy Strategy,” sponsored by the Clinton School Center on Community Philanthropy. At USC, Pastor is director of the program for environmental and regional equity and co-director of the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration. His most recent book, “Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future,” documents the gap between progress in racial attitudes and racial realities, and offers a new set of strategies for both talking about race and achieving racial equity