Cotton and Race and the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power

Cotton and Race and the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power

Gene Dattel

10.12.2011

Gene Dattel

Gene Dattel is a financial historian, author, lecturer, government and private sector advisor on American and Asian financial institutions, media commentator, and former international capital markets investment banker at Salomon Brothers and Morgan Stanley. He is also a theatrical contributing writer and performer.

Dattel received his B.A. in History from Yale and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School. He is on the Board of Advisors of the BB King Museum in Indianola, MS and has served as an advisory scholar to The New York Historical Society on its Slavery II--Cotton and Commerce exhibition (2005). Dattel is the author of two books - Cotton and Race in the Making of America (2009) and The Sun That Never Rose (1994).

Financial historian and author Gene Dattel discusses his book, "Cotton and Race and the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power," which looks at the complexity of cotton’s productive role in America’s rise to economic power from 1787 to 1930. Dattel also provides insights about the complexity of race and the Civil Rights era from an American, not just Southern, perspective.