Looking Back at the Arkansas Gazette

Looking Back at the Arkansas Gazette

Roy Reed

4.19.2009

Roy Reed

Roy Reed was an Arkansas Gazette reporter for eight years before becoming a national and foreign correspondent for the New York Times in 1965. In 1969 he opened a Times bureau in New Orleans, where he reported on the rapid social, political and economic changes in the South and other parts of the nation. After a stint at the Times’s London bureau in the mid-1970s, Reed returned to Arkansas and taught journalism for 16 years at the University of Arkansas journalism department. After retiring from teaching, he continued to write books and occasional pieces for newspapers and magazines.
Reed is the author of Looking for Hogeye (1986), a collection of essays about the South, and Faubus: The Life and Times of an American Prodigal (1997), which was a New York Times Notable Book for 1997. Reed’s latest book, Looking Back at the Arkansas Gazette: An Oral History, was published by the University of Arkansas Press.

Longtime Arkansas Gazette reporter Roy Reed discusses his new book, "Looking Back at the Arkansas Gazette," an oral history of the famed newspaper consisting of interviews from over a hundred former Gazette staffers recalling the stories they reported on and the people they worked with from the late forties to the paper’s end in 1991. The Gazette is inextricably linked with Arkansas history, reporting on every major state event until the paper’s end after a long newspaper war.