Odyssey of a Derelict Gunslinger

Odyssey of a Derelict Gunslinger

John Camp

11.9.2009

John Camp

John Camp spent twenty-five years digging dirt as an investigative reporter for network and local television. He is the recipient of dozens of broadcast journalism’s most prestigious prizes, including four George Foster Peabody medallions ? the so-called Pulitzer Prizes of broadcasting. He also collected three Alfred I. Dupont citations from Columbia University, two Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE) awards, and numerous other muckraking prizes. His stories and accomplishments have been the subject of books, magazine articles, and newspaper stories.

John became a fulltime investigative reporter in 1972 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana following ten years of broadcasting experience as a radio reporter, news director, and talk show host. After winning the 1973 Radio Television News Directors International Award for Investigative Reporting, he moved to television, first in Miami and later in Boston.

In 1982, he returned to Baton Rouge. During the next seven years, his documentaries on ABC affiliate, WBRZ, received multiples of every major broadcasting award for investigative reporting, earning the station a reputation as one of the the nation’s leading television news operations.

In 1989, he was recruited as Senior Correspondent for CNN’s newly created 30-member investigative reporting team. He left the network in 1998 and has since produced documentaries for Public Broadcasting.

In his book, "Odyssey of a Derelict Gunslinger," former CNN investigative correspondent and four-time Peabody award winner John Camp highlights the "Clinton Rules," which he defines as "a form of reporting in which the political terrorists are given more credibility by mainstream journalists than irrefutable evidence contradicting their propaganda." Camp himself spent a great amount of time covering Arkansas-related issues during the Clinton years. Barry Seals, the Mena Airport, Whitewater, independent counsels, Jim McDougal, FOB’s, and other now legendary Arkansas political stories are featured in the book which Camp discusses at the Clinton School.