Upcoming Speakers

May 2016

Tuesday, May 3
6pm
Douglas Brinkley

 Douglas Brinkley is an award-winning and New York Times best-selling author, a professor of history at Rice University, a fellow at the James Baker Institute for Public Policy, and an editor at Audubon Magazine. In his new book, Rightful Heritage: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Land of America, Brinkley focuses on FDR and his essential yet under-sung legacy as the founder of the Civilian Conservation Corps and premier protector of America’s public lands. FDR built from scratch dozens of State Park systems and scenic roadways. During his years as president, FDR established hundreds of federal migratory bird refuges, spearheaded the modern endangered species movement, and positioned his conservation goals as economic policy to combat the severe unemployment of the Great Depression. Rightful Heritage chronicles both a portrait of FDR’s passion and skill to illuminate the tension between business and nature of both exploiting and conserving our national resources. *Book Signing to follow

*Reserve your seats by emailing publicprograms@clintonschool.uasys.edu or calling (501) 683-5239.

Thursday, May 5
6pm
Ron Fournier

Ron Fournier is a national political journalist currently of the National Journal, a frequent contributor for political-themed TV shows, and has previously served as Washington bureau chief at the Associated Press. In his new book, Love That Boy: What Two Presidents, Eight Road Trips and My Son Taught Me About a Parent’s Expectations, Fournier explores ideas of what we want from our children – popularity, normalcy, achievement, genius – and what we truly need – grit, empathy, character. In Love That Boy, Fournier weaves through his journey as a parent to acceptance around the latest research on childhood development and stories of other loving-but-struggling parents.*Book Signing to follow

*Reserve your seats by emailing publicprograms@clintonschool.uasys.edu or calling (501) 683-5239.

Friday, May 6
12pm
Steven Barnett

Steven Barnett is Board of Governors professor of education and the director of the National Institute for Early Education Research at Rutgers University, and has served as a consultant for early childhood policy for many states and national leaders around the world. His research includes wide ranging studies on early childhood policy and economics, including research on long-term effects of early education programs, benefit-cost analyses of the Perry Preschool and Abecedarian programs, randomized trials of alternative approaches to educating bilingual/migrant populations and the Tools of the Mind curriculum, and the series of State Preschool Yearbooks providing annual state-by-state analyses of progress in public pre-K. Barnett's recent publications include "Effectiveness of early educational intervention" in the journal Science.

*Reserve your seats by emailing publicprograms@clintonschool.uasys.edu or calling (501) 683-5239.

Thursday, May 19
6pm
Robin Sanders

Robin Sanders is the former U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria and the Republic of Congo, former U.S. Permanent Representative to the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), and former director of the Africa National Security Council at the White House. She currently serves as CEO of FEEEDS Advocacy Initiative, which focuses on food security, education, environment, economic development and self-help projects, particularly in Africa. An international lecturer, and writer on Africa, Sanders has lectured on international and African affairs, national security strategies, strategic and cultural communications, and conflict resolution. She also focuses on other areas of expertise, such as election and democratic processes, smart food security-environment systems, education and the environment.

*Reserve your seats by emailing publicprograms@clintonschool.uasys.edu or calling (501) 683-5239.

Monday, May 23
6pm
Leonard Cassuto

Leonard Cassuto is graduate education columnist for The Chronicle of Higher Education and professor at Fordham University. In his new book, The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It, Cassuto explores the root of the problems in graduate education – students taking too long to complete their studies and facing a dismal academic job market if they succeed – and offers concrete solutions for revitalizing graduate education in the humanities. He argues that universities’ heavy emphasis on research comes at the expense of teaching and that graduate education must recover its mission of public service. He also argues that professors should revamp the graduate curriculum and broaden its narrow definition of success to allow students to create more fulfilling lives for themselves both inside and outside the academy. In The Graduate School Mess, Cassuto follows the graduate student from admissions to the dissertation and placement, and considers how each stage of graduate education is shape by unexamined assumptions and ancient prejudices that need to be critically confronted.

*Reserve your seats by emailing publicprograms@clintonschool.uasys.edu or calling (501) 683-5239.